A Tale of Two Failures

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.  The company hired contractors to do maintenance work so that the full time developers can write a new system, the company hired new developers to write a new system stuck original developers with the maintenance work.

When software has been bankrupted by tech debt, a common strategy is to start over.  Just like financial bankruptcy, the declaration is a way to buy time while continuing to run the business.  The software can’t be turned off, someone has to keep the old system running while the new system is built. Depending on your faith and trust in your current employees you will be tempted to either hire “short term” contractors to keep things running, or hire a new team to write the new system.

The two tactics play out differently, but the end result is the same, the new system will fail.

Why Maintenance Contractors Fail

Contractors fail because they won’t have the historical context for the code.  They may know how it works today, but not how it got there. Without deep business knowledge their actions are limited to superficial bug fixes and tactical features.  The job is to keep the lights on, not to push back on requests or ask Who, What, Where, When, Why.

Since the contractors are keeping the lights on for you while current employees build a new system, they aren’t going to care about the long term quality of the system.  It’s already bad, it’s already going away, why spend the extra time refactoring.

Contractors won’t be able to stabilize the system and buy your employees enough time to build the new system.  Equally bad, sometimes the contractors *will* stabilize the old system which becomes an excuse to cancel the new system and not restructure your debts.

Why Hiring a New Team Fails Too

The flip side is to leave the current team in place and hire a new team to write the new system.  This is super attractive when you suspect that the original team will recreate the same mistakes that led to disaster.

This tactic fails because the new team won’t have the historical context for the code.  Documentation and details will be superficial and lack all of the critical edge cases. All of which delays the project.  Meanwhile, your original team will become extremely demoralized.  

If they couldn’t keep things running before, wait until you tell them their whole job is to keep things running.  The most capable members will quickly leave and you’ll have to pull developers from the new team onto the old system.

You’ll end up pulling the new developers onto the old team and praying they don’t see it as bait-and-switch.

Don’t split on Old vs New

Both tactics fail because the teams are divided between old vs new.  In the end it doesn’t matter who is on which team, because you need old *and* new to be successful.

Keeping the team together ensures that everyone has context into how the system works and has skin in the game.

Instead of splitting old vs new, find a way to split the system in half.  Have each team own half the old system responsibilities, and one of the two new systems.  This gives everyone a stake in keeping the old system alive, a chance to work on the new system, and reduces the business risk of either team failing.

Once you find a way to split the responsibilities in half, you might even find a way to make iterative improvements, it’s your Best Alternative to a Total Rewrite!

Leave a Reply