Infrastructure Consolidation Drives Early Tenancy Migrations

For SaaS with a pure Single Tenant model, infrastructure consolidation usually drives the first two, nearly simultaneous, steps towards a Multi-Tenant model.  The two steps convert the front end servers to be Multi-Tenant and switch the client databases from physical to logical isolation.  These two steps are usually done nearly simultaneously as a SaaS grows beyond a handful of clients, infrastructure costs skyrocket and things become unmanageable.

Diagram of a single tenant architecture become multi-tenant

Considering the 5 factors laid out in the introduction and addendumcomplexity, security, scalability, consistent performance, and synergy this move greatly increases scalability, at the cost of increased complexity, decreased security, and opening the door to consistent performance problems.  Synergy is not immediately impacted, but these changes make adding Synergy at a later date much easier.

Why is this such an early move when it has 3 negative factors and only 1 positive?  Because pure Single Tenant designs have nearly insurmountable scalability problems, and these two changes are the fastest, most obvious and most cost effective solution.

Complexity 

Shifting from Single Tenant servers and databases to Multi-Tenant slightly increases software complexity in exchange for massively decreasing platform complexity.

The web servers need to be able to understand which client a request is for, usually through sub domains like client.mySaaS.com, and use that knowledge to validate the user and connect to the correct database to retrieve data.

Increased complexity from consolidation

The difficult and risky part here is making sure that valid sessions stay associated with the correct account.  

Database server consolidation tends to be less tricky.  Most database servers support multiple schemas with their own credentials and logical isolation.  Logical separation provides unique connection settings for the web servers.  Individual client logins are restricted to the client’s schema and the SaaS developers do not need to treat logical and physical separation any differently.

Migrations and Versioning Become Expensive

The biggest database problems with a many-to-many design crop up during migrations.  Inevitably, web and database changes will be incomparable between versions.  Some SaaS models require all clients on the same version, which limits comparability issues to the release window (which itself can take days), while other models allow clients to be on different versions for years.

Versioning and Migration Diagram

The general solution to the problem of long lived versions is to stand up a pool of web and database servers on the new version, migrate clients to the new pool, and update request routing.

Security

The biggest risk around these changes is database secret handling; every server can now connect to every database.  Compromising a single server becomes a vector for exposing data from multiple clients.  This risk can be limited by proxy layers that keep database connections away from public facing web servers.  Still a compromised server is now a risk to multiple clients.

Changing from physical to logical database separation is less risky.  Each client will still be logically separated with their own schema, and permissioning should make it impossible to do queries across multiple clients.

Scalability

Scalability is the goal of Multi-Tenant Infrastructure Consolidation.

In addition to helping the SaaS, the consolidation will also help clients.  Shared server pools will increase stability and uptime by providing access to a much larger group of active servers.  The client also benefits from having more servers and more slack, making it much easier for the SaaS to absorb bursts in client activity.

Likewise, running multiple clients on larger database clusters generally increases uptime and provides slack for bursts and spikes.

These changes only impact response times when the single tenant setup would have been overwhelmed.  The minimum response times don’t change, but the maximum response times get lower and occur less frequently.

Consistent Performance

The flip side to the tenancy change is the introduction of the Noisy Neighbor problem.  This mostly impacts the database layer and occurs when large clients overwhelm the database servers and drown out resources for smaller clients.

This can be especially frustrating to clients because it can happen at any time, last for an unknown period, and there’s no warning or notification.  Things “get slow” and there are no guarantees about how often clients are impacted, notice, or complain.

Synergy

There is no direct Synergy impact from changing the web and database servers.

A SaaS starting from a pure Single Tenant model is not pursuing Synergy, otherwise the initial model would have been Multi-Tenant.

Placing distinct client schemas onto a single server does open the door to future Synergy work.  Working with data in SQL across different schemas on the same server is much easier than working across physical servers.  The work would still require changing the security model and writing quite a bit of code.  There is now a doorway if the SaaS has a reason to walk through.

Conclusion

As discussed in the introduction, a SaaS may begin with a purely Single Tenant model for several reasons.  High infrastructure bills and poor resource utilization will quickly drive an Infrastructure Consolidation to Multi-Tenant servers and logically separated databases.

The exceptions to this rule are SaaS that have few very large clients or clients with high security requirements.  These SaaS will have to price and market themselves accordingly.

Infrastructure Consolidation is an early driver away from a pure Single Tenant model to Multi-Tenancy. The change is mostly positive for clients, but does add additional security and client satisfaction risks.

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